There are different versions of Google Chrome. Most people has the regular stable version. But there are other options which we are sharing today with you guys if you have never heard of them – Google Chrome Beta Versions Explained.

What most people has is the stable version of Chrome and that’s the right version you go to download. Its updated every several weeks and there is lot of testing done before any feature get to the stable version.

However, if you like to live on the edge there are other options for early releases of Chrome calls Development Channels and these include the Beta Version, Developer Version and even the Canary Version. These versions receive updates faster than the stable version.

Beta Channel

The Beta Version is updated once a week with major updates around every six weeks and you can expect to get updates on the beta channel about a month before you would in the stable channel.

It’s actually reasonable stable just with less testing.

So if you want to get updates reasonably early without having to risk too many bugs then the beta channel is probably pretty good for you.

Google Chrome Beta Versions Explained

Google Chrome Beta Versions Explained

Developer Channel

If you want to get updates even more frequently you can go with the developer channel.

It gets updates as soon as they are released. There are no delays even for major updates.

The developer channel of course does get much less testing so it’s going to be more prone to bugs but that’s the price to pay for getting updates really quickly.

Google Chrome Beta Versions Explained

Google Chrome Beta Versions Explained

You Can’t install Beta and Stable Version at the Same Time

Canary Channel

In Canary as soon as updates are in its push to you and you get in chrome.

There is no testing done or anything like that and there is no real schedule for update.

Canary is bit special because its run separately from other installation of chrome.

You can’t have both the beta and stable installed. But with Canary its separate because it could be so buggy.

So theoretically even if you have one of the other versions you can still also have the Canary version installed.

Google Chrome Beta Versions Explained

Google Chrome Beta Versions Explained

Why would you need these early release versions?

The first to get updates early, secondly you might be testing out to see if a bug is fixed in a new version.

For example, if you have issues with your version of chrome maybe a plugin isn’t working or stop behaving like you want. you could load up the canary version or the Developer version and see if that issue is fixed and then you can know that the update to fix that bug is coming down the line.

As we mentioned the beta and developer channels are going to replace the stable version so you can’t have more than one of those installed same time.

What you have to do is uninstall the stable version and then reinstall the beta or the developer version and if you want to go back you have to uninstall early release version and then install the stable ones again.

It’s better to just keep canary version installed because it doesn’t affect the other ones and then you can test it out every once in awhile if you want to without needing to reinstall anything.

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4 Comments

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